We’re Going on a ‘Teddy’ Bear Hunt

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
We’re going on a ‘Teddy’ bear hunt…….I’m not scared!
We have a gorgeous book which comes with a CD that tells the story of the adventure of going on a bear hunt.  My kids have played this CD over many times as I watch them pretend to walk through long, wavy grass and run away from a bear.  So I thought I would bring this story to life some more by creating the different scenes in the book.
Playing with songs and books help prepare children for future learning and teach them beginning pre-reading skills.  Re-enacting we’re going on a bear hunt is a fun activity we can do with our kids to help promote this learning through play.
 
The Book:
‘Bear Hunt’ comes with a CD which is read by Noni Hazelhurst with Benita Collings, Alister Smart and George Spartels who are from ABC4Kid’s television show Play School.  Illustrated by Patricia Mullins.  Published by The Five Mile Press Pty Ltd
There is another version of ‘We’re Going on a Bear Hunt’ written by Michael Rosen and Helen Oxenbury.
activity ideas for we're going on a bear hunt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Uh-oh.  (Uh-oh)
Grass. (Grass)
Long wavy grass.  (Long wavy grass).
We can’t go over it.  (We can’t go over it).
We can’t go under it.  (We can’t go under it.)
We’ll have to go through it!
Swish, swish, swish, swish!
 
To make our “Long Wavy Grass” we opened up a box so that both ends were open like a tunnel.  When the box is open like this, it can become unstable so we strengthened it with masking tape.  We also placed a large pillow on either side of the box to help hold it up firm for when the kids would crawl through it.  We then sticky taped green streamers down over the two openings of the box.  We also placed our green mat inside the box but you could alternatively use a green towel or blanket.
activities with books for kids and toddlers
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Uh-oh.  (Uh-oh)
Mud. (MUd)
Thick oozy mud.  (Thick oozy mud).
We can’t go over it.  (We can’t go over it).
We can’t go under it.  (We can’t go under it.)
We’ll have to go through it!
Squelch, squelch, squelch, squelch!
 
To make our thick oozy mud, we simply placed a number of cushions and pillows on the floor and laid a brown blanket on top imitating the thick oozy mud.
bear activities for kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Uh-oh.  (Uh-oh)
A cave. (A cave)
A dark gloomy cave.  (A dark gloomy cave).
We can’t go over it.  (We can’t go over it).
We can’t go under it.  (We can’t go under it.)
We’ll have to go through it!
Tiptoes, tiptoe, tiptoe, tiptoe!
 
To create our cave, we a placed a brown fitted sheet over our dining chairs which were arranged in the shape of a cave.  I used a fitted sheet because I find this clings better to the dining chairs and is less likely to slide off.
 
Learning Experiences:
  • Encourages and promotes imaginative play and creativity.
  • Getting little bodies moving through dance and rhythm.
  • Develop and extend vocabulary.
  • Rhyme – understanding rhyme in our spoken language helps children learn to read.
  • Rhythm- helps children to remember words and develop auditory memory skills.
  • Phonemic awareness – hearing and understanding that words are made up of individual sounds and other word patterns. 
Other Teddy Bear Activities on Learning4kids:
Nursery Rhyme Activity for Kids
 
 
 
 
 
Teddy Bears Everywhere
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Learning 4 kids

Tin Can Music Makers

Simple Homemade musical instruments for kids and toddlers
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
These Tin Can Music Shakers are a simple homemade musical instrument to make and you will find most of the materials around the home. 
We play a lot of music in our home and the Tin Can Music Makers were so much fun and a great addition to our creative play.
 
What you will need?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
You will need coloured paper, clean recycled tin cans, balloons, scissors, glue, stickers and rice or other fillings for the shaker.  We also used coconut shavings, dried split peas and uncooked pasta to create different sounds such as soft and loud.  My girls had fun trying to pick which item was making that sound when they shook the tin.
 
Let’s Play
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pretending to play bongo drums!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shake, shake!!  Here are my girls having so much fun dancing to their favourite songs and shaking their Tin Can Music Makers.  We also played games with no music playing, trying to guess what was inside the tin.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
And more drums….
 
Learning experiences from making a homemade Tin Can Music Makers:
  • Develop a sense of pride and achievement.
  • Encourages and promotes imaginative play and creativity.
  • Fine motor development and eye-hand coordination.
  • Getting little bodies moving through dance and rhythm.
  • Fun!
 Other Homemade Musical Instruments here on Learning4kids:
(Click on the Images to read more)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Learning 4 kids

Homemade Guitar

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
An empty shoe box + elastic bands + a cardboard tube = Homemade Guitar and endless hours of fun!
These guitars are such a simple homemade instrument to make and will bring so much fun to kids play times!  The elastic bands when stroked make a similar sound to that of a guitar, a bit of a twanging sound, making playing with them seem that much more real.
 
What you will need?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
You will need an empty shoe box (not the lid), elastic bands, masking tape, scissors and a cardboard tube.  To decorate the guitar we used paint, stickers and pompoms.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trace around the end of the cardboard tube on one end of the shoe box and cut it out.  Make small vertical cuts into one end of the cardboard tube, these cuts will be opened up later to help attached it to the shoe box with masking tape.  Slide the tube through the hole and open up the cuts parts to attach to the box with masking tape.
Stretch the elastic bands over the shoe box which will compress the centre of the box form a guitar like shape.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To personalise their guitar my girls painted them and Miss 5 also traced around a small plate to make a circle on the inside of the shoe box just like a real guitar.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
When the paint was dry we stuck on some stickers and glued some pompoms onto the cardboard roll. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Put the kid’s favourite music on and have fun!  These guitars have brought so much fun and play as my girls have pretended to be in a rock n’ roll band.  They have even pretended that the guitar was a ukulele.
 
Learning experiences from making a homemade guitar:
  • Develop a sense of pride and achievement.
  • Encourages and promotes imaginative play and creativity.
  • Fine motor development and eye-hand coordination.
  • Fun!
Thanks for reading, please leave a comment I would love to hear from you!
Learning 4 kids
 

Number Tree Display

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Back in the days when I was teaching I always aimed at having a classroom that was a literacy and numeracy rich environment.  Creating a ‘rich print’ of numbers, letters and words as a visual focus for kids to observe, recall and refer to during their learning and everyday activities. 
Now that I am a parent, I still like to make this a priority for my kids and have this rich print around the house.  I like to involve my kids in creating this environmental print, making it more purposeful and fun!
This is part of the reason why we have created our Number Tree, to use it as a fun display of bright coloured numbers to add to our environmental print.  We have reused our paper mache tree and turned it into a Number Tree Display. 
You can download and print off these numbers to make your own display below.
 
What you will need?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
You will need the Printable Numbers and coloured paper.  You may alternatively print off the numbers onto white paper and have the kids colour or paint them.  I printed off two copies of each page and also laminated our numbers to help make them last longer and to reuse them again later.
The paper mache tree is one option, we have just reused ours from previous activities but you could also make a cut out paper tree and stick it up on the wall for kids to place the numbers.  The leaves on our paper mache tree have been made using layers of folded green crepe paper cut into leaf shapes and my kids just sticky taped them on. 
Useful link: How to make a paper mache tree?
Click here to download and print: Printable Numbers – Number Tree Display
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To add a bit more excitement and fun to this activity, rather than just sticking the numbers onto the tree, we placed all the numbers into a bag and each child had to pull one number out at a time and say what the number was.  Then we sang the Nursery Rhyme This Old Man before placing the numbers onto the tree. 
This old man he played (pull out a number) ’2’,
He played knick knack on my shoe,
With a knick knack patty wack give a dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.
Repeat the song for each number taken out of the bag and adding in the appropriate words to the song to match.
 
This was great to familiarise and expose Miss 21months to numbers as she was watching, copying and doing the actions, repeating and attempting to repeat some of the words that were being said. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Miss 4 having a turn at pulling a number out of the bag.  It was really interesting to watch as she placed the number 4 onto the tree, she was turning and moving it around to make sure it is the correct way up.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The other set of numbers that we had printed off were put up onto the wall with Blu-Tac and my kids were able to move the numbers around.  They played with the numbers by moving them into different orders, counting from zero to nine and also counting backwards.  Miss 4 and 5 also made new numbers by putting two numbers together and sorting them into groups according to colour.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The importance of environmental print:
Exposing children to a print rich environment helps them recognise  and understand that print means something as they are attempting to make sense of the world around them.  It also assists them in developing pre-reading skills.
 
Some Examples of environmental print:
  • Books, signs, posters, labels, charts, cereal boxes, magazines, murals, child’s work, calendars and chalk or white boards.
Other useful links:
 
Learning 4 kids

The Nursery Rhyme Box

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I love nursery rhymes and there isn’t a day that goes past where we do not sing one.  Sometimes we will change the words around in a nursery rhyme to fit in with what we may be doing during the day such as putting our shoes on.
 
The Nursery Rhymes Box is an activity developed to encourage and promote oral language development in young children.  It is essentially a box filled with a number of props that will trigger a nursery rhyme song, such as a stuffed toy cow may trigger the nursery rhyme ‘Hey Diddle Diddle’ or ‘Old Mac Donald had a Farm’ because these nursery rhymes have a cow in their lyrics.
 
What you will need?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
You will need a large box and number of props or characters that are found in nursery rhymes.  We painted our nursery rhyme box and printed off the words to stick on the side.
Our nursery rhyme box had 12 items in it:
  1. Star (from our Christmas ornaments) –Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
  2. Spider (Homemade from toilet roll) – Little Miss Muffet
  3. Tea Pot – I’m a little tea pot
  4. Teddy Bear - Teddy bear turn around or Rock a Bye Your Bear
  5. Doll – Miss Polly had a Dolly
  6. Stuffed Toy Cow – Hey Diddle or Old Mac Donald
  7. Owl – The Owl and the Pussy Cat
  8. Stuffed Toy Dog – Old Mother Hubbarb or How Much is that Doggie
  9. Puppet Mouse – Hickory Dickory
  10. Puppet Frog – 5 Little Speckled Frogs
  11. Monkey – Monkey Up a Tree
  12. Toy Car – Let’s go Driving
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The idea behind the nursery rhyme box is to pick one item out of the box at a time and think of a nursery rhyme (or song) that has that character or object in it.  Then you sing the nursery rhyme together with all the actions included. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
Miss 4 singing Twinkle Twinkle after picking out a star from the nursery rhyme box and Miss 19 Months role playing and practising her sounds/words singing – How much is that Doggie?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Once the box is empty- it is a great place to play and special hugs!
 
Benefits of singing nursery rhymes:
  •  Develop and extend vocabulary.
  • Rhyme – understanding rhyme in our spoken language helps children learn to read.
  • Rhythm- helps children to remember words and develop auditory memory skills.
  • Phonemic awareness – hearing and understanding that words are made up of individual sounds and other word patterns.
  • Fine motor skills and coordination – Encourages actions and movement.
  • This activity is also great for teaching social skills – taking turns.

Learning 4 kids

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