Neapolitan Ice Cream Play Dough Fun

Neapolitan Ice Cream Play Dough Fun (learning4kids)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Neapolitan Ice Cream Play Dough is a wonderful and fun sensory activity to arouse the imagination and creativity.  The Neapolitan Ice Cream Play Dough is scented with chocolate, vanilla and strawberry and smell just like the real Neapolitan ice cream.  Children can explore their sense and experiment, pretend and make the most amazing creations with this fun play dough.
 
What you will need?
Invitation to play Neapolitan Ice Cream Play Dough - learning4kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To set up this invitation to play you will need the play make the Neapolitan Ice Cream Play Dough.  It is super easy and you can find the <recipe here>.
You will also need ice cream scoops, beads to imitate sprinkles, miniature pompoms to imitate candy lollies, ice cream bowls and spoons and also cardboard ice cream cones.
To make the pretend ice cream cones we used paper towel rolls and cut them length ways down the middle.  We then twisted the cardboard to form the cone shape and placed a piece of sticky tape on the join to hold it together.
To make the ice cream stand, we took two empty shoe boxes and turned them upside down and carefully pressed 6 holes into the box with scissors, twisting to make the holes wider.  Next we covered the shoe boxes with coloured wrapping paper and again pressed through the holes with scissors.  Finally, we then neatened up the holes by folding sticky tape over the rough edges.
 
Let’s Play
Let's play and pretend ice cream shop
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Some ideas:
  • Pretend play an ice cream shop.
  • Create colour patterns with the different coloured play dough on the ice cream cones.
  • Sing songs about ice cream such as “I Dream of Ice Cream”.
  • Play Guess the Scent: cover your child’s eyes with a cloth and place each of the scented play dough underneath their nose.  They are to try and guess which scented/flavour play dough they can smell.
  • Make marble patterns with the play dough by squeezing and pressing the different colours together.  Use a cookie cutter to make pretend marble patterned cookies.
  • Learn about counting and sharing (division) by counting and sharing out a number of scoops between a number of bowls or people.
 Let’s Learn
learning opportunities with play dough
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Learning Opportunities
  • Creativity
  • Fine Motor Development
  • Hand-Eye Coordination and Control
  • Cause and Effect
  • Concentration
  • Spatial awareness – experimenting with shape and space
  • Language development
  • Imaginative play – Pretend Play Ice Cream Shop
  • Recognising patterns, colours and scents.
If you liked this activity then you will enjoy our Imaginative Ice Cream Shop <CLICK HERE> to take a look!
Ice Cream Shop 9
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Learning 4 kids

Imaginative Play Felt Pizza

How to make a felt pizza
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Create an opportunity for your child to take on the role as a pizza chef and play creatively as they pretend make different pizzas using felt pizza toppings and other props.
It is amazing the wonderful creative ideas they will come up with as my kids made several pizzas faces, patterns using different felt toppings provided.
 
The great thing about making a felt pizza and toppings is that it becomes a toy that can be played with over and over again.  Our Felt Pizza is still played with on a regular basis and sits in the toy kitchen.
 
What you will need?
How to make a felt pizza
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
You will need a pizza box, cardboard, PVA craft glue, an array of coloured felt, pizza props such as tomatoe sauce bottle, spatula and food containers.  You will also need the printable pizza toppings sheet as a guide or template for making the different food toppings.
To make the pizza base I measured and cut a circle out of cardboard and glued cream coloured felt onto the board.  While I was waiting for this to dry, I cut out the different pizza toppings using the coloured felt sheets I had, tomatoe (red), pineapple and cheese (yellow), capsicum (green), ham (pink), mushrooms (brown), olives (black) and onion (white).
I also placed labels of the different pizza toppings on the bowls to encourage reading.
Click here to download and print: Printable Felt Pizza Toppings
 
 
Let’s Play
elt Pizza Imaginative Play
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pretending to squeeze on different flavoured sauces and using the spatular to spread the topping.
Imaginative Play Felt Pizza Topping 2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As my kids played I noticed that some of the pizza toppings made were sometimes random, others were placed more deliberately creating patterns.  Miss 2 loved to sprinkle all the toppings on from a great height.
Creating Pizza Patterns
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other fun things you can create with a felt pizza, patterns and pizza faces!   Note the red ribbon (tomatoe) in the hair of the pizza face, olives for eyes, mushroom nose with onion eye brows and smile and pineapple ears.
 
Learning Opportunities
  • It provides opportunities for children to identify with the adult world.  Practice and role play their understanding and interpretation.
  • Develop social skills: practising negotiation skills, turn taking and sharing. Provides opportunities for working out problems and experimenting with solutions.
  • Emotional development: Understanding and expressing their feelings through the re-enactment of certain experiences.  Taking on roles that encourage discipline and empathy.
  • Encourages imagination: Children can be anyone and do anything in the pretend world.
  • Develop language skills: practicing listening, looking and talking.  Being spoken to and talking with other people, also developing an understanding of what is being communicated through body language such as smiles and nodding.
  • Creativity, exploring with space and shape.
Find more activities & other ideas…..
Ice Cream Shop 8
Imaginative Play Ice Cream Shop
Imaginative Play Vet Hospital
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Learning 4 kids

Planting a Garden

Imaginative Play - Planting a Garden
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Imaginative play would have to be one of my most favourite kinds of play.  I love how children can freely explore an imaginary world and benefit so much from it. 
We have been spending a fair bit of time in our garden with the beautiful warm summery weather.  As a follow on activity to our Spring Play Dough and to re-enact our time spent in the garden I thought I would set up this invitation to play imaginatively, Planting a Garden.
My girls spent hours planting, re-planting, weeding, sprinkling seeds and watering their imaginative play garden.
 
You can find out more about what imaginative play is and how to encourage it with kids by following the link: What is Imaginative Play and How to Encourage it?
What you will need?
Planting a Garden 2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
We have re-used our Fake Flowers from our Create a Scented Spring Play Dough Garden Activity and the Styrofoam is recycled from a cardboard box from a parcel we received.
Planting a Garden 3
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To create an imaginative play garden, you press the firm wire stems from the fake flowers into the Styrofoam.  Miss 2 had no trouble pressing them into the Styrofoam but if this is of a concern, you can always pre-make some holes for your child to place the flower stems into. 
This activity is such a wonderful way to also practice those fine motor skills!
For older kids, such as my Miss 5 and 6, they created flower garden patterns, alternating certain flowers to create patterns of colours and flower types.
Planting a Garden 4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Miss 2 pretending to water her garden that she created with the Styrofoam and fake flowers.  She was also making swishing sounds to go with the watering, priceless!
Planting a Garden 5
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The magic of imaginative play….. Miss 2 sprinkling her garden with flower seeds from a small container and Miss 5 watering them into the ground.
 
Learning Benefits of Imaginative Play:
  • It provides opportunities for children to identify with the adult world.  Practise and role play their understanding and interpretation.
  • Develop social skills: practising negotiation skills, turn taking and sharing. Provides opportunities for working out problems and experimenting with solutions.
  • Emotional development: Understanding and expressing their feelings through the re-enactment of certain experiences.  Taking on roles that encourage discipline and empathy.
  • Encourages imagination: Children can be anyone and do anything in the pretend world.
  • Develop language skills: practising listening, looking and talking.  Being spoken to and talking with other people, also developing an understanding of what is being communicated through body language such as smiles and nodding.
  • I also believe that imaginative play is a great way for children to relax and unwind from their busy lives.
More Imaginative Play:
Learning 4 kids

We’re Going on a ‘Teddy’ Bear Hunt

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
We’re going on a ‘Teddy’ bear hunt…….I’m not scared!
We have a gorgeous book which comes with a CD that tells the story of the adventure of going on a bear hunt.  My kids have played this CD over many times as I watch them pretend to walk through long, wavy grass and run away from a bear.  So I thought I would bring this story to life some more by creating the different scenes in the book.
Playing with songs and books help prepare children for future learning and teach them beginning pre-reading skills.  Re-enacting we’re going on a bear hunt is a fun activity we can do with our kids to help promote this learning through play.
 
The Book:
‘Bear Hunt’ comes with a CD which is read by Noni Hazelhurst with Benita Collings, Alister Smart and George Spartels who are from ABC4Kid’s television show Play School.  Illustrated by Patricia Mullins.  Published by The Five Mile Press Pty Ltd
There is another version of ‘We’re Going on a Bear Hunt’ written by Michael Rosen and Helen Oxenbury.
activity ideas for we're going on a bear hunt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Uh-oh.  (Uh-oh)
Grass. (Grass)
Long wavy grass.  (Long wavy grass).
We can’t go over it.  (We can’t go over it).
We can’t go under it.  (We can’t go under it.)
We’ll have to go through it!
Swish, swish, swish, swish!
 
To make our “Long Wavy Grass” we opened up a box so that both ends were open like a tunnel.  When the box is open like this, it can become unstable so we strengthened it with masking tape.  We also placed a large pillow on either side of the box to help hold it up firm for when the kids would crawl through it.  We then sticky taped green streamers down over the two openings of the box.  We also placed our green mat inside the box but you could alternatively use a green towel or blanket.
activities with books for kids and toddlers
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Uh-oh.  (Uh-oh)
Mud. (MUd)
Thick oozy mud.  (Thick oozy mud).
We can’t go over it.  (We can’t go over it).
We can’t go under it.  (We can’t go under it.)
We’ll have to go through it!
Squelch, squelch, squelch, squelch!
 
To make our thick oozy mud, we simply placed a number of cushions and pillows on the floor and laid a brown blanket on top imitating the thick oozy mud.
bear activities for kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Uh-oh.  (Uh-oh)
A cave. (A cave)
A dark gloomy cave.  (A dark gloomy cave).
We can’t go over it.  (We can’t go over it).
We can’t go under it.  (We can’t go under it.)
We’ll have to go through it!
Tiptoes, tiptoe, tiptoe, tiptoe!
 
To create our cave, we a placed a brown fitted sheet over our dining chairs which were arranged in the shape of a cave.  I used a fitted sheet because I find this clings better to the dining chairs and is less likely to slide off.
 
Learning Experiences:
  • Encourages and promotes imaginative play and creativity.
  • Getting little bodies moving through dance and rhythm.
  • Develop and extend vocabulary.
  • Rhyme – understanding rhyme in our spoken language helps children learn to read.
  • Rhythm- helps children to remember words and develop auditory memory skills.
  • Phonemic awareness – hearing and understanding that words are made up of individual sounds and other word patterns. 
Other Teddy Bear Activities on Learning4kids:
Nursery Rhyme Activity for Kids
 
 
 
 
 
Teddy Bears Everywhere
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Learning 4 kids

Rainy Day Activity – Indoor Camping

It’s raining, it’s pouring…..and we have been stuck inside a fair bit lately with the weather.
To entertain the kids and give them something to do we set up an indoor camping trip to beat the boredom and promote imaginative play.
Here are a few ideas for setting up your own Indoor Campsite.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Firstly we set up a tent with sleeping bags, pillows and a torch.  Then we set out some camping chairs, esky filled with pretend food, cooking utensils and crockery such as tongs and cooking pots and pans.  On the wall we placed some photos of other camp sites that we printed off the internet, this was great to give my kids some ideas on setting up their own campsite.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Every indoor camp site needs a pretend fire and we made ours using a small cane basket filled with red cellophane, paper towel rolls and twigs.  My kids placed their camp torch underneath the red cellophane to make it look like red flames were glowing.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cooking on our pretend campfire: I love how Miss 6 is making toast using tongs over the pretend fire.  Check out Miss 23 months camping in luxury with her fluffy slippers, haha!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Whenever we go camping the marshmallows are always on top of our list of things to bring, so we had to have them a part of our indoor camping experience.  Adding to the fun of play, we put marshmallows onto the end of some twigs and my girls pretended to cook them over the campfire.  We later cooked them on the gas stove – yummo!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Learning benefits of imaginative play – Indoor Camping Trip
  • It provides opportunities for children to identify with the adult world.  Practise and role play their understanding and interpretation.
  • Develop social skills: practising negotiation skills, turn taking and sharing. Provides opportunities for working out problems and experimenting with solutions.
  • Emotional development: Understanding and expressing their feelings through the re-enactment of certain experiences.  Taking on roles that encourage discipline and empathy.
  • Encourages imagination: Children can be anyone and do anything in the pretend world.
  • Develop language skills: practising listening, looking and talking.  Being spoken to and talking with other people, also developing an understanding of what is being communicated through body language such as smiles and nodding.
  • I also believe that imaginative play is a great way for children to escape, relax and unwind from their busy lives.
What would you include in your Indoor Campsite?
Learning 4 kids
 
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