5 Green & Speckled Frogs Activity Ideas

5 Green Speckled Frogs Activities 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5 Little Speckled Frogs or 5 Green Speckled Frogs has always been a favourite nursery rhyme of mine. The oral language and numeracy benefits are so important in the early years of development.
 
Here are two activity ideas for your toddler or pre-schooler to play with this fabulous rhyme.
 
CREATING PLAY DOUGH GREEN & SPECKLED FROGS
Creating Speckled Frogs with play dough
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This is such a fun activity where children can create their very own Green and Speckled Frogs.  It encourages kids to explore their creativity and imagination.
The materials I added to the play dough table were Green Speckled Play Dough, bottle tops and googly eyes.  I also included cut out frog images to provide some ideas and also to look closely at the different shapes and features of the frogs in the pictures, then to try and re-create them.
The frog images are available as a printable here –> Printable Frog Images – Speckled Frogs
 
SPECKLED FROGS MATHS GAME
5 Speckled Frogs Counting Game
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The aim of this game is to encourage basic counting, subitising, addition and subtraction skills.
Children are provided with a green laminated frog, a dice and Green and Speckled Play Dough.  The idea is to roll the dice and then make the number of speckles for the frogs tummy that is shown on the dice.  Roll the dice again, do we need to add or takeaway any speckles.
The Frog Image for this activity is available on the second page of this printable –>
Printable Frog Images – Speckled Frogs
 
 5 Little Speckled Frogs Activity Ideas
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Learning Benefits:
  • Fine motor development and eye-hand coordination.
  • Literacy: oral language development through a repetitive and predictable rhyme.
  • Numeracy: addition and subtraction concepts.
  • Numeracy: counting and subitising numbers 1-6.
  • Imagination and creativity.
Counting and Subitising Activities 7
 
More information and activities on subitising, click <HERE>
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
5 Green and Speckled Frogs Activity Ideas
 
 
How to make Green and Speckled Play Dough?  Click <HERE>
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Eye spy with my little eye, some more FANTABULOUS frog activities around the web!

Frog on a Lilly Pad with Printable Template by The Craft Train
Milk Bottle Jumping Frogs by A Little Learning for Two
Printable Frog Mask by Wildlife Fun 4 Kids
Frog Egg Fun by Wildlife Fun 4 Kids
Five Green Frogs – Printable by Picklebums
 
Learning 4 kids
 

‘R’ is for Rain & Making a Rain Craft

R is for Rain - Alphabet Letter R Activity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Making our rain craft was so much fun and a great way to encourage language development! 
 
The idea started with Miss 2, who absolutely loves to sing a rain song at the moment, which I think is called “Rain is Falling Down….Pitter Patter”.  I wanted to encourage and support her learning and development by utilising her interests, so I thought we would create our very own rain to play and sing-a-long with.
 
The rain and cloud also turned out to be a wonderful piece of artwork now in our play room which I bring down once in a while for Miss 2 to sing and play with.
What you will need?
Rain is Falling Down 2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
You will need blue paper, cotton wool balls, string, PVA craft glue, paint brushes (for applying glue), sticky tape and dark blue and light blue crepe paper.
I cut our blue sheet of paper into the shape of a cloud and glued it onto an empty cereal box to make it stronger and less flimsy.
To create the rain drop shapes, I folded the crepe paper over in layers and with a pen drew a small tear drop shape, then cut it out.  Folding the crepe paper over several times created a number of rain drops, saving time with cutting.
Making the Rain Craft:
Rain is Falling Down 3
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
Some of this activity was completed by Miss 2 independently with some guidance and other parts were completed with more support and guidance from me.  Every child is different and at various stages of development.  Either way I truly believe that sitting and being with your child to share creating something together is so important and beneficial, not the fact that they completed it all by themselves.  Children benefit so much from our guidance and presence; we are their first teacher and role model. 
We also broke the activity up into parts as it can be time consuming and little attention spans may lose interest.
  1. Apply the PVA glue to the cloud with a paint brush.
  2. Stick the cotton wool balls onto the glue by carefully and gently pulling the fibres apart to spread the cotton wool more thinly.  Allow the glue to dry.
  3. When the glue has dried, turn the cloud over and sticky tape the string on the back to dangle down at different lengths.
  4. Sticky tape the rain drops to the string.  Some assistance may be required with this part.
Winter Craft - Making Rain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
Time to play with our Raining Cloud:  Miss 2 happily sang her favourite rain song as she dangled and swished the rain drops to and fro.
Learning Links:
  • Encourages and promotes imaginative play and creativity.
  • Develop and extend vocabulary.
  • Rhyme – understanding rhyme in our spoken language helps children learn to read.
  • Rhythm- helps children to remember words and develop auditory memory skills.
  • Phonemic awareness – hearing and understanding that words are made up of individual sounds and other word patterns.
Learning 4 kids

The Nursery Rhyme Box

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I love nursery rhymes and there isn’t a day that goes past where we do not sing one.  Sometimes we will change the words around in a nursery rhyme to fit in with what we may be doing during the day such as putting our shoes on.
 
The Nursery Rhymes Box is an activity developed to encourage and promote oral language development in young children.  It is essentially a box filled with a number of props that will trigger a nursery rhyme song, such as a stuffed toy cow may trigger the nursery rhyme ‘Hey Diddle Diddle’ or ‘Old Mac Donald had a Farm’ because these nursery rhymes have a cow in their lyrics.
 
What you will need?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
You will need a large box and number of props or characters that are found in nursery rhymes.  We painted our nursery rhyme box and printed off the words to stick on the side.
Our nursery rhyme box had 12 items in it:
  1. Star (from our Christmas ornaments) –Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
  2. Spider (Homemade from toilet roll) – Little Miss Muffet
  3. Tea Pot – I’m a little tea pot
  4. Teddy Bear - Teddy bear turn around or Rock a Bye Your Bear
  5. Doll – Miss Polly had a Dolly
  6. Stuffed Toy Cow – Hey Diddle or Old Mac Donald
  7. Owl – The Owl and the Pussy Cat
  8. Stuffed Toy Dog – Old Mother Hubbarb or How Much is that Doggie
  9. Puppet Mouse – Hickory Dickory
  10. Puppet Frog – 5 Little Speckled Frogs
  11. Monkey – Monkey Up a Tree
  12. Toy Car – Let’s go Driving
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The idea behind the nursery rhyme box is to pick one item out of the box at a time and think of a nursery rhyme (or song) that has that character or object in it.  Then you sing the nursery rhyme together with all the actions included. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
Miss 4 singing Twinkle Twinkle after picking out a star from the nursery rhyme box and Miss 19 Months role playing and practising her sounds/words singing – How much is that Doggie?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Once the box is empty- it is a great place to play and special hugs!
 
Benefits of singing nursery rhymes:
  •  Develop and extend vocabulary.
  • Rhyme – understanding rhyme in our spoken language helps children learn to read.
  • Rhythm- helps children to remember words and develop auditory memory skills.
  • Phonemic awareness – hearing and understanding that words are made up of individual sounds and other word patterns.
  • Fine motor skills and coordination – Encourages actions and movement.
  • This activity is also great for teaching social skills – taking turns.

Learning 4 kids

Teddy Bears Everywhere!

Nursery Rhyme Activity for Kids
Lately I have been trying to find fun opportunities to help develop and encourage Miss 14 month’s speaking, listening and language skills.  One of the best ways I know how is to sing and play with nursery rhymes with her.  Nursery rhyme activities can be done with all ages, Miss 3 and 5 also played along with us.
 
Nursery rhymes also help prepare children for future learning and teach them beginning pre-reading skills.  Teddy Bears Everywhere is a fun nursery rhyme activity we can do with our kids to help promote this learning through play. 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
Gather all teddy bears you have in the house
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This part is soooo much fun!  It involves collecting up as many teddy bears in the house and placing them in the centre of the room.  Kids love the challenge of searching and finding the teddy bears for this activity!
We then use these teddy bears to act out and sing along to many of our favourite teddy bear nursery rhymes, Teddy Bear Teddy Bear, Rock-a Bye Your Bear and Round and Round the Garden.  Changing the teddy bears we use for each nursery rhyme.
Using real toy teddy bears brings this activity to life!  It promotes imagination, creativity, learning and fun!
Nursery rhyme activities for kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Round and round the garden like a teddy bear, (Finger circulating small circles around ted’s tummy)
A one step, a two-step, (Walking finger actions)
Tickling him under there! (Tickling ted under the chin)
Print lyrics here
Rock-a-by your bear song for kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Everybody clap (clap)
Everybody sing (la la la la la)
Bow to your partner (bow teddy)
Then you turn around (spin teddy around)
Hands in the air (place ted’s hands in the air)
Rock-a-bye your bear (cradling ted in arms)
Bear’s now asleep (sh sh sh)
Print lyrics here
Teddy bear nursery rhyme activities for kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Use a teddy bear to follow the actions to this song:
Teddy bear teddy bear turn around
Teddy bear teddy bear touch the ground
Teddy bear teddy bear turn off the light
Teddy bear teddy bear say good night
Print more verses here
Nursery rhyme activities for kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Benefits of singing nursery rhymes:
  • Develop and extend vocabulary.
  • Rhyme – understanding rhyme in our spoken language helps children learn to read.
  • Rhythm- helps children to remember words and develop auditory memory skills.
  • Phonemic awareness – hearing and understanding that words are made up of individual sounds and other word patterns.
  • Fine motor skills and coordination – Encourages actions and movement.
Thanks for reading!
Learning 4 kids

Someones Hiding, Down in a Box, Until……..

Jack is hiding down in his box.....Jack in the Box is a favourite game of my kids!  All you need is a box! 
It involves singing the well-known nursery rhyme Jack in a Box and acting out the words on cue to the song.  We use the box as a creative prop and make the acitivty fun!
 
We decorated our box using paint…..any excuse to get the paints out!
 
Jack in a box is so much fun; it will have your kids wanting to do it over and over again! It is also great for all ages; even my littlest Miss 1 loves to play.
 
 Jack is hiding down in his box…….until someone opens the lid…….BOO!!
 
Imaginative play song activities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jack in a box jumps UP!
Activities for kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jack in a box goes FLOP!
songs for kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jack in a box goes ROUND and ROUND!
Song activities for kids
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The lid goes down with a PLOP!
 
  • You don’t need a box to do this activity!  I sing this song while holding Miss 1 and carry out the actions on cue with the words. This makes her giggle endlessly!
Here is an example of what you can do without a box!  Be sure to carefully support the child’s body through the actions.
 
Jack in a box jumps up!    (Jump up holding child close to body)
Jack in a box goes flop!     (Flop child out away from body-supporting head & neck)
Jack in a box goes round and round!     (Spin around holding child)
The lid goes down with a plop!    (Gently drop your body while holding your child in a downwards action)
 
Ideas and Tips:
  • To personalise the game; you could replace the name Jack with your child’s name.  “Sarah in the box jumps up!”
  • Nursery rhymes and songs are great for developing oral language skills.
  • Kids love to play with boxes and nursery rhymes.
Printable Lyrics for Jack in the Box
 
Thank you to my beautiful Miss 3 for being part of the photos….xx
 
 
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